Scales and Weigh Stations

weigh stations

If you’ve ever hit the open road, traveling to areas far and wide, you’ve no doubt seen a few weigh stations or at least the signs for them. Near state borders these stations are called by a different name; “Port of Entry.” If you have ever wondered what weigh stations are for, and how they work, this month’s blog entry is a must read.

Why weigh stations?

Taxes

All commercial vehicles weighing 2,000 pounds (1 ton) or more must enter state mandated weigh stations if they are open. In Arizona, all vehicles over 10,000 pounds are also required to enter the weigh stations, for which the state has 32 of. This allows states like Arizona to collect fuel taxes from the trucks traveling on their highways. These taxes help maintain the roads and bridges.

Safety

Structurally speaking, the interstates we travel on have certain limitations on weight; under 80,000 pounds according to Federal law. If trucks were to continuously exceed this limit, the roads may become damaged over time, eventually becoming unsafe for vehicles of any weight to travel. An overloaded truck presents a hazard for both its operator and other drivers on the road; maneuvering and stopping become difficult.

Profitability

Companies that buy products as well as ship products to their own customers require accurate weights. In fact, businesses both small and large rely on it, as the value of many goods is largely dependent on weight. Recording accurate weights ensures fair trade, decreases costs, and increases profitability. As you can see, weighing trucks is a win-win for all parties involved!

How trucks are weighed

Southwestern Scale Company is proud to offer an exhaustive list of truck scales that are used by today’s trucking companies and weighing stations. We sell, service, calibrate, and repair wheel-weighers, concrete decks, portable scales, axle scales, digital scales, and more. If you’re in the market for a truck scale, contact Southwestern Scale Company today at (602) 243-3951, or visit us online at www.swscale.com.

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